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dc.contributor.authorKatsikari, Katerina
dc.contributor.authorPedersen, Mads Erling
dc.contributor.authorBerget, Ingunn
dc.contributor.authorVarela, Paula
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-21T07:52:21Z
dc.date.available2024-05-21T07:52:21Z
dc.date.created2024-05-15T13:51:32Z
dc.date.issued2024
dc.identifier.citationFood Quality and Preference. 2024, 119 1-9.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0950-3293
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11250/3130851
dc.description.abstractFood texture can influence sensory perception and eating behaviour; it can be managed to affect intake, by inducing higher expected satiety and satiation, and eventually reducing overeating. The objective of this work was to assess face reading as an automatic measure of oral processing behaviour of products with different texture modifications, aimed at reducing intake. Three oat breads with different textural properties were used as a case study. A trained panel used Temporal Dominance of Sensations to describe dynamic sensory profiles of the breads and were simultaneously video recorded; the videos were analysed by FaceReader (intake, chewing motions, chewing period). The parameters extracted through face reading showed significant differences among the breads in duration of chewing period and number of chewing motions, which can be interpreted together with the TDS results. A consumer test (n = 135) was conducted on the breads, where participants evaluated overall liking, expected satiation and satiety, and answered a Check-All-That-Apply question including sensory and non-sensory attributes. Results indicated that the samples were significantly different in terms of liking, expected satiation and satiety and that consumers described samples in CATA question in line with the panel. Results interpreted together allowed the identification of the dynamic textural properties responsible for enhancing satiety and satiation expectations. Methodological implications are discussed throughout the paper. The novelty of the study is to show that automatic measures of oral processing behaviour by face reading, can be linked to self-reported explicit measures of satiety, opening the door to larger studies, unfeasible using manual annotation.
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.titleUse of face reading to measure oral processing behaviour and its relation to product perceptionen_US
dc.title.alternativeUse of face reading to measure oral processing behaviour and its relation to product perceptionen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.description.versionpublishedVersion
dc.description.versionpublishedVersion
dc.source.pagenumber1-9en_US
dc.source.volume119en_US
dc.source.journalFood Quality and Preferenceen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foodqual.2024.105209
dc.identifier.cristin2268910
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 314318
dc.relation.projectNofima AS: 202103
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1


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